Hypnotherapy, effective treatment for Irritable Bowel Syndrome

///Hypnotherapy, effective treatment for Irritable Bowel Syndrome

Hypnotherapy, effective treatment for Irritable Bowel Syndrome

Hypnotherapy and IBS are once again in the spotlight. Scientists in Sweden have recently published a study that found Hypnotherapy to be an effective treatment for Irritable Bowel Syndrome.

This isn’t the first time it was proven that hypnotherapy has lasting benefits on easing IBS symptoms. That’s right, many such studies have already been carried out in various Universities. This time Swedish researchers conducted a study involving 346 patients, proving Hypnotherapy to be a valid alternative treatment to ease the symptoms of IBS.

What’s even more interesting, the Researchers at The Sahlgrenska Academy of the University of Gothenburg, Sweden found that hypnotherapy not only alleviates the discomfort of IBS by as much as 40%, but that the changes remain long-term. A previous study published in the Scandinavian Journal of Gastroenterology found that hypnotherapy helped 208 patients alleviate IBS discomfort and that the benefits were sustained even seven years later.

Irritable Bowel Syndrome is the name given to a host of otherwise unexplained symptoms relating to a disturbance of the colon or large intestine. It has been reported that IBS affects around a third of the population at some point in their lives and, about one in 10 people suffer symptoms severe enough to seek help from their GP. Swedish researchers found Hypnotherapy to be a valid alternative treatment to ease the symptoms of IBS, that doesn’t involve popping pills or making diet changes.

The treatment of Hypnotherapy involves teaching patients to control their symptoms with deep relaxation and hypnotic suggestions. Patients learn to use these techniques to help them in their everyday lives.

“The conclusion is that hypnotherapy could reduce both the consumption of healthcare and the cost to society, and that hypnosis therefore belongs in the arsenal of treatments for IBS,” says Magnus Simren, a researcher involved with the study at Gothenburg University.

written by: Katherine Ferris

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2017-05-24T14:15:58+00:00